Report | Environment California Research & Policy Center

More Wind, Less Warming

American wind power already produced enough energy in 2013 to power 15 million homes. Continued, rapid development of wind energy would allow the renewable resource to supply 30 percent of the nation’s electricity by 2030, providing more than enough carbon reductions to meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Clean Power Plan.

Report | Environment California Research & Policy Center

In the Path of the Storm

After yet another year in which many parts of the country were hit by scorching heat, devastating wildfires, crippling drought, record floods and severe storms like Hurricane Sandy, a new Environment California Research & Policy Center report finds that weather-related disasters are affecting hundreds of millions of Americans, and documents how global warming could lead to certain extreme weather events becoming even more common or more severe in the future.

Report

Environment California's 2013 Legislative Agenda

Environment California is your statewide environmental group that works to win real results for California's environment. Here is a list of Environment California's 2013 legislative priorities.

Report | Environment California Research & Policy Center

Greening the Bottom Line 2012

All across California, businesses, farms, government agencies, schools and nonprofits are demonstrating that action to reduce heat-trapping emissions can improve competitiveness and strengthen the bottom line. Energy efficiency measures and clean energy projects reduce waste, cut energy costs, limit exposure to fossil fuel price spikes, and attract environmentally aware customers.

Report | Environment California Research & Policy Center

Wind Power for a Cleaner America

Coal- and natural gas-fired power plants pollute our air, are major contributors to global warming, and consume vast amounts of water—harming our rivers and lakes and leaving less water for other uses. Wind energy has none of these problems. It produces no air pollution, makes no contribution to global warming, and uses no water.

America has more than doubled its use of wind power since the beginning of 2008 and we are starting to reap the environmental rewards. Wind energy now displaces about 68 million metric tons of global warming pollution each year—as much as is produced by 13 million cars. And wind energy now saves more than enough water nationwide to meet the needs of a city the size of Boston.

Report | Environment California Research & Policy Center

Making the Grade with Clean Energy

Solar energy makes sense for California’s schools. This first-of-its-kind report presents case studies from 18 California school districts that have installed solar energy projects at nearly 200 schools combined, illustrating the environmental, economic and educational benefits of going solar in our schools.

Report | Environment California Research & Policy Center

Greening the Bottom Line 2012

Reducing global warming pollution is critical to protecting California’s environment, but doing so can also deliver big rewards for our state’s economy. This report highlights eight organizations that have made investments in clean energy solutions, together reducing their emissions of global warming pollution by the equivalent of nearly 270 million pounds of carbon dioxide per year while saving approximately $3.60 million annually.

Report | Environment California Research and Policy Center

When It Rains It Pours

Global warming is happening now and its effects are being felt in the United States and around the world. Among the expected consequences of global warming is an increase in the heaviest rain and snow storms, fueled by increased evaporation and the ability of a warmer atmosphere to hold more moisture.

Report | Environment California Research and Policy Center

In the Path of the Storm

4 out of 5 Californians live in areas hit by recent weather disasters. 

Report | Environment California Research and Policy Center

Building a Better America

California families could save over $450 every year on their electricity bills by 2030 if the government invests in the energy efficiency of our buildings today, according to a new report by Environment California Research and Policy Center.  Saving energy in our buildings would also help California’s fight against global warming, reducing global warming pollution from buildings by 35% – the equivalent of taking 12.6 million cars off the road.

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